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How to survive a market downturn as a real…

How to survive a market downturn as a real estate agent

Fear mongering is not my thing. I don’t like planting the seeds of the worst case scenario either. However, in business, there has to be a window of awareness that clues you into the possibilities — whether they be good or bad …

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Five questions: What a Cal State Fullerton professor is…

Five questions: What a Cal State Fullerton professor is learning about deadly mudslides

  • Civil engineering professor Binod Tiwari stands at the village of Langtang, Nepal, where a debris avalanche killed more than 300 people in 2015. He flew by helicopter to conduct a field investigation of the debris avalanche. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)

    Civil engineering professor Binod Tiwari stands at the village of Langtang, Nepal, where a debris avalanche killed more than 300 people in 2015. He flew by helicopter to conduct a field investigation of the debris avalanche. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)

  • Binod Tiwari, Cal State Fullerton professor of civil and environmental engineering, has studied mudslides and landslides around the world, including in Southern California, to understand their causes and mitigate their devastation. (Photo by Karen Tapia)

    Binod Tiwari, Cal State Fullerton professor of civil and environmental engineering, has studied mudslides and landslides around the world, including in Southern California, to understand their causes and mitigate their devastation. (Photo by Karen Tapia)

  • Cal State Fullerton civil and environmental engineering professor Binod Tiwari (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)

    Cal State Fullerton civil and environmental engineering professor Binod Tiwari (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)

  • In this photo provided by Santa Barbara County Fire Department, Santa Barbara County Fire search dog Reilly looks for victims in damaged and destroyed homes in Montecito, Calif. following deadly runoff of mud and debris from heavy rain on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. (Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)

    In this photo provided by Santa Barbara County Fire Department, Santa Barbara County Fire search dog Reilly looks for victims in damaged and destroyed homes in Montecito, Calif. following deadly runoff of mud and debris from heavy rain on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. (Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)

  • Debris and mud cover the entrance of the Montecito Inn after heavy rain brought flash flooding and mudslides to the area in Montecito, Calif. on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. (Daniel Dreifuss)

    Debris and mud cover the entrance of the Montecito Inn after heavy rain brought flash flooding and mudslides to the area in Montecito, Calif. on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. (Daniel Dreifuss)

  • In this photo provided by Santa Barbara County Fire Department, mud and debris flow due to heavy rain in Montecito. Calif., Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. (Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)

    In this photo provided by Santa Barbara County Fire Department, mud and debris flow due to heavy rain in Montecito. Calif., Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. (Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)

  • A member of the Long Beach Search and Rescue team looks for survivors in a car in Montecito, Calif. on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. (Daniel Dreifuss)

    A member of the Long Beach Search and Rescue team looks for survivors in a car in Montecito, Calif. on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. (Daniel Dreifuss)

  • In this photo provided by the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, an engine company from the city of Colton, Calif., operating under mutual aid, keeps watch on pockets of burning and unburned vegetation off Bella Vista Drive in Montecito, Calif., Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017. (Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)

    In this photo provided by the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, an engine company from the city of Colton, Calif., operating under mutual aid, keeps watch on pockets of burning and unburned vegetation off Bella Vista Drive in Montecito, Calif., Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017. (Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)

  • In this photo provided by the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, pockets of unburned vegetation flare up off Bella Vista Drive in Montecito, Calif., Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017. (Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)

    In this photo provided by the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, pockets of unburned vegetation flare up off Bella Vista Drive in Montecito, Calif., Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017. (Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)

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The catastrophic mudslide that inundated houses in Montecito in Santa Barbara County in January, killing 21 people, appeared to hit suddenly. But the disaster, mere weeks after a wildfire scorched the area, didn’t come out of nowhere.

For over two decades, Cal State Fullerton’s Binod Tiwari has studied such mudslides and landslides around the world, including in Southern California, to understand their causes and mitigate their devastation.

In 2014, the civil and environmental engineering professor and his students worked on a regional study on debris flow and mudflow after a series of December storms. The study included areas affected by the Silverado Canyon fire and the 91 Freeway fire, both in September 2014. It found that reports of mudflows and mudslides appeared to be exclusively in areas that burned that year or the year before.

Where the largest debris flows occurred during the December storms, they were generally expected. Where recently burned areas on steep slopes did not experience flows or slides, such as the Silverado fire zones, the biggest and perhaps only reason appeared to be that the rainfall was less intense and prolonged than the known threshold that initiates such events, the study said.

In 2015, Tiwari traveled to Nepal, his homeland, to co-lead an international team that evaluated damage to buildings after an earthquake killed more than 8,600 people. He did something similar after the 2011 quake and tsunami in Japan.

Tiwari, named CSUF’s outstanding professor in 2017, is a vice president of the International Consortium on Landslides and an executive editor of the consortium’s journal Landslides. He is an editor for many of the books, teaching tools and forum proceedings that ICL publishes, and he organizes conferences and collaborates with United Nations organizations on disaster preparedness for landslides.

Tiwari recently answered questions for the CSUF News Service on his latest research efforts to reduce deaths and property destruction caused by catastrophic mudslides:

What is a mudslide versus a landslide?

Mudslides and landslides seem to be synonymous, but they are different. A landslide is the movement of soil or rock mass due to the loss of resistance against the force that is pushing the soil or rock downwards and outwards. Landslides involve a shallow or deep soil/rock mass, which could be dry or saturated with water. As such, they are slides and not a flow. A mudslide is generally a flow of saturated soil mass that has water content high enough for the soil to behave as liquid. Mudslides happen very quickly with fast-moving soil and water.

What causes these natural disasters?

Landslides are caused by the downward seepage of rainwater through the soil mass, which increases the weight of soil, and in most cases, results in raising the groundwater toward the surface and causing soil failure. Landslides can occur due to other causes, such as earthquakes and snowmelt — with soil erosion, in many cases, the primary cause. Mudslides are caused by water saturation of the immediate topsoil layer from rainfall. Wildfires are a triggering factor for mudslides usually due to vegetation loss.

What have you learned through your research efforts?

My research involves landslide and mudslide mitigation in the United States, Japan and Nepal. My work focuses on trying to figure out the rainfall amount per hour, which causes infiltration into the soil to trigger landslides, as well as soil erosion. The intensity of rainfall, as well as slope inclination and lack of vegetation cover, play crucial roles in triggering mudslides. The prevention of landslides requires expensive countermeasures, mostly resistive in nature, such as re-grading the slopes, managing groundwater, restraining slopes with piles, and retaining walls and anchors.

Vegetation and water management are the main preventive measures for mudslides. Barrier dams constructed on gullies and creeks, and retaining walls near properties adjacent to slopes, can also help to reduce the devastating effects of mudslides.

Are you planning any new research efforts on this front?

Together with my students, this spring we will be studying the impact of vegetation loss in triggering mudslides. I have a rain simulator system and a slope model box in my research lab, and we will study how we can minimize post-wildfire mudslides like what happened in the Santa Barbara area. We will be simulating various slopes from Southern California wildfire-affected areas over the past 10 years. We’ll also be evaluating the stability of slopes and the potential for mudslides, using different rainfall intensities and durations, with and without vegetation cover. Additionally, we will explore the effectiveness of various types of mudflow barriers for temporary and long-term protection of properties from potential mudslides.

Do you have any advice to those living in areas prone to mudslides and landslides?

If the risk of mudslide or landslide is high, people need to be ready to evacuate the risk-prone area during intense rainfall.

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Cal State Fullerton students suffering hardship have new source…

Cal State Fullerton students suffering hardship have new source of help

Cal State Fullerton students experiencing hardships such as food or housing insecurity can now stop by a new center on campus for anything from a toothbrush to an interview outfit to temporary housing.

Tuffy’s Basic Needs Services Center opened Feb. 14 in Room 143 of McCarthy Hall.

The center promotes wellness and offers support — food assistance, short-term housing, hygiene products, professional clothing, emergency grant funds and off-campus social services — to enable students to complete their education.

“Students who face sudden crisis situations that cause basic-needs hardships will clearly struggle to meet academic expectations,” said Carmen Curiel, associate dean of students. “A center specifically intended to address these concerns and provide needed resources can help restore a student’s well-being and in turn result in educational achievement.”

Other area colleges have opened food pantries recently.

Tuffy’s Basic Needs Services Center is coordinated by the Dean of Students Office, supporting the CSU’s systemwide Basic Needs Initiative. A 2015 study by the chancellor’s office estimated that 8 to 12 percent of the system’s 460,000 students live in unstable housing conditions and that 21 to 24 percent lack regular access to food.

Resources offered at Tuffy’s Basic Needs Services Center:

  • Food assistance in the form of gift cards to campus dining locations, donated meals at the Gastronome, Titan Bites messaging app, CalFresh Program, referrals to a full-service pantry near campus
  • Emergency temporary housing for up to two weeks
  • Hygiene products
  • Gently used professional attire
  • Financial support for unforeseen emergencies, crises or catastrophic events

For more information, visit the Dean of Students Office website or call 657-278-3211.

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Man, teenage girls wanted in Seal Beach robbery of…

Man, teenage girls wanted in Seal Beach robbery of T-Mobile store

SEAL BEACH Police are searching for a man and two teenage girls wanted in connection with a robbery Saturday, Feb. 17 at a T-Mobile store.

Shortly before 6:30 p.m., the man and girls entered the store at 13936 Seal Beach Blvd., Sgt. Mike Henderson said in a statement.

The man removed cellphones from a display area and threatened an employee with pepper spray, Henderson said.

The man then fled the store without discharging the spray. The employee was uninjured, he said.

The man is described as Hispanic, in his 30s, with a mustache and about 5 feet 6 inches tall and about 230 pounds.

He was wearing a black shirt and black shorts and has a tattoo of red lips on his neck, Henderson said.

The girls are about 13 and 14 years old, he added.

Anyone with information about the robbery is asked to contact Detective Jeff Gibson at 562-799-4100 ext. 1109.

 

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Boy Scouts spruce up CSUF’s Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary

Boy Scouts spruce up CSUF’s Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary

In honor of National Boy Scout Day, local Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts held a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado.

Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary is owned and operated by CSUF’s College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Renowned for its birding, the sanctuary offers three nature trails, a picnic area, an amphitheater and a Natural Science Center with interactive exhibits, live animals, native animal taxidermy and children’s activities. Its Native Plant nursery sells drought-tolerant plants.

The sanctuary will hold a guided bird walk led by artist and birder Julie Williams on Saturday, March 24, at 8:10 a.m. The walk is suitable for beginning and intermediate birders. Visitors will explore native habitats and learn to identify local birds. Suitable for ages 12 and older, the event costs $5 per person. Reservations are required and may be made by calling 714-649-2760.

— Wendy Fawth

  • Max Freeman, 5, of Irvine, closes his eyes to listen for the sounds of birds and other forms of nature during a tour of Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary Saturday. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

    Max Freeman, 5, of Irvine, closes his eyes to listen for the sounds of birds and other forms of nature during a tour of Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary Saturday. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

  • Cub Scout Fletcher Freeman, 9, of Irvine, watches birds during a tour of Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

    Cub Scout Fletcher Freeman, 9, of Irvine, watches birds during a tour of Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

  • A California scrub jay lands on a feeder inside Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

    A California scrub jay lands on a feeder inside Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

  • Recent CSUF graduate Angela Castanon of La Habra plants bushes to provide protection for quail that frequent this area in search of food. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

    Recent CSUF graduate Angela Castanon of La Habra plants bushes to provide protection for quail that frequent this area in search of food. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

  • Boy Scouts from Troop 801 remove weeds along Harding Truck Trail. Scout member Cameron Abrahamson, 16, center, works with fellow troop members. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

    Boy Scouts from Troop 801 remove weeds along Harding Truck Trail. Scout member Cameron Abrahamson, 16, center, works with fellow troop members. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

  • Site manager Marcella Gilchrist, left, explains trail work duties to Boy Scout Troop 801 along Harding Truck Trail. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

    Site manager Marcella Gilchrist, left, explains trail work duties to Boy Scout Troop 801 along Harding Truck Trail. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

    The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

  • Site manager Marcella Gilchrist, right, explains the do’s and don’ts of Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary to Boy Scout Troop 801 from Brea. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

    Site manager Marcella Gilchrist, right, explains the do’s and don’ts of Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary to Boy Scout Troop 801 from Brea. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

  • Boy Scout John Collier, 12, of Brea, center, holds a shovel in preparation for trail work. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

    Boy Scout John Collier, 12, of Brea, center, holds a shovel in preparation for trail work. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

  • Site manager at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary Marcella Gilchrist gives Boy Scouts a work briefing. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

    Site manager at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary Marcella Gilchrist gives Boy Scouts a work briefing. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

  • Boy Scout Daniel Gobre, 13, of Brea, listens during the morning work briefing. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

    Boy Scout Daniel Gobre, 13, of Brea, listens during the morning work briefing. The Boy Scouts of America, in honor of National Boy Scout Day, hosted a day of hikes, tours, restoration planting and trail maintenance Feb. 10 at Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, Silverado. (Photo by Greg Andersen, Contributing Photographer)

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Swardstrom sinks back-to-back shots to lift Crean Lutheran into…

Swardstrom sinks back-to-back shots to lift Crean Lutheran into Division 3AA semifinals

IRVINE – Crean Lutheran junior Chris Swardstrom made just three baskets Tuesday night, but he sank two of them in the final nine seconds to lift the Saints to a 42-40 victory over San Gabriel Academy in the quarterfinals of the CIF-SS 3AA playoffs at Crean Lutheran High.

The victory sends Crean Lutheran (21-9) into the semifinals for the second time in school history and the first time since 2016. The Saints will face St. Anthony Friday night in Long Beach.

With the score tied 40-40, Crean Lutheran got the ball with 2.7 seconds left following a travelling call against San Gabriel Academy. The Saints passed the ball the length of the court and got it to Swardstrom, who cooly sank the fade-away outside jumper at the buzzer and was mobbed by the Saints students.

“That’s the way coach drew it up and we ran the play,” Swardstrom said. “I got an open shot, so I shot it.”

Swardstrom’s 3-pointer with nine seconds remaining tied the score 40-40.

“I was confident I could make that shot,” Swardstrom said of the 3-pointer. “I do it every day at practice.”

Swardstrom wound up with eight points. Jake Conerty (18 points) and Isaiah Johnson (13 points) led the Saints’ scoring.

San Gabriel Academy (26-5) was led by Malakhi Jensen with 10 points.

“It was a great game,” said Crean Lutheran coach Josh Beaty. “Chris Swardstrom had a huge game for us. It’s awesome to see. I’m so happy for him; I’m very proud of him. He’s had some ups and downs, so to see him step up when it matters most and have the confidence to make those big shots, it was very rewarding to see that.”

San Gabriel Academy led 16-6 after one quarter and 25-17 at halftime.

Crean Lutheran battled back, outscoring San Gabriel Valley 10-7 in the third quarter to cut the lead to five going into the final quarter.

A dunk by Johnson early in the fourth quarter cut the lead to three and got the home team fans fired up.

Crean Lutheran tied the score 37-37 with 2 minutes left on a basket by Johnson,.

San Gabriel Academy moved ahead 40-37 on a basket by Ian McCloskey with 57.9 seconds left before the Saints rallied.

“Everyone was nervous, understandably so (in the first half),” Beaty said. “We just never really got settled in. It took a half until we got settled in. It was a grind, it was hard to score tonight. Luckily, our press opened things up and got us some easy baskets.

“We’ve got good players and good kids. I feel fortunate that we’re in the situation that we are.”

Beaty praised the play of sophomore guard Derek Bagatourian.

“Early, when things went really poorly for us, we were having a hard time scoring, he took three charges in one quarter,” Beaty said. “That is the most important game changing sequence because if they would have scored those buckets, we would have been down by 20 at halftime.”

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Haunted house, iFullerton videos win awards for three Cal…

Haunted house, iFullerton videos win awards for three Cal State Fullerton students

Videos on a haunted house and the iFullerton app won awards for three Cal State Fullerton communications students in the Broadcast Education Association Festival of Media Arts competition.

Abbey Fernandez, a senior studying communications, won second place in the television feature category for her video “Horror Bootcamp,” about the 17th Door haunted house in Fullerton, which aired on Univision and the CSUF student-produced Spanish-language newscast “Al Día.”

Communications student Cassidy Jo Fortin, along with Nathan Jeffers, won an award of excellence for the promotional video “Welcome Video 2017.” (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)

Cassidy Jo Fortin and Nathan Jeffers won an award of excellence for their entry in the promotional video category, “Welcome Video 2017,” about the many features of the iFullerton app. Fortin is a senior studying cinema and television arts and journalism with a minor in sociology. Jeffers is a graduate student studying communications.

The festival received over 1,540 entries in its 15 competitions.

New ‘Internet of Things’ curriculum gets boost

With a grant from Cisco Systems Inc., Cal State Fullerton is setting up an interdisciplinary elective track for undergraduates on the “internet of things.”

Classes will provide students with the technical skills for the emerging field of connecting smart devices to the internet — from refrigerators to lights to cars.

The nearly $300,000 grant, awarded through the Silicon Valley Community Foundation in collaboration

Cal State Fullerton assistant professor of computer science Anand Panangadan is co-leading the development of the "internet of things" elective track. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)
Cal State Fullerton assistant professor of computer science Anand Panangadan is co-leading the development of the “internet of things” elective track. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)

with Cisco Corporate Social Responsibility, supports a new curriculum in the computer science and computer engineering programs.

The internet of things is a set of computing technologies that promises to bring intelligence to devices used in everyday life, said Anand Panangadan, assistant professor of computer science, who is co-leading the effort with Kiran George, professor of computer engineering.

Faculty members will develop the curriculum with input from representatives of Orange County’s tech sector. The first course, “Rapid Prototyping for IoT,” debuts this summer.

“Students will learn to collect measurements from sensors, analyze the data for patterns, build internet applications using these sensors, and understand the differences of computing using tiny embedded processors versus regular desktop computers,” George explained.

Cal State Fullerton professor of computer engineering Kiran George is co-leading the development of the "internet of things" elective track. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)
Cal State Fullerton professor of computer engineering Kiran George is co-leading the development of the “internet of things” elective track. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)

Students will also explore entrepreneurial ideas related to the internet of things, with computer science and business students working together on real-world projects and creating business plans. Also planned are a speaker series featuring industry experts and outreach programs for high school students.

“Public universities such as Cal State Fullerton have the capacity to produce a digitally skilled workforce in the Southern California region, shaping new ideas and industries to fuel the local economy,” said Tae Yoo, Cisco’s senior vice president of corporate affairs/corporate social responsibility.

‘Active learning’ math initiative expands to CSUF

Cal State Fullerton has joined a National Science Foundation-funded initiative to expand “active learning” methods to help undergrads pursuing STEM degrees succeed in introductory calculus courses.

CSUF is receiving $93,300 for its project, directed by Alison S. Marzocchi and Roberto Soto, both assistant professors of mathematics. That’s part of a $3 million, five-year grant for 12 universities, according to the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities.

Mathematician Roberto Soto is co-leading a CSUF project to help students pursuing STEM degrees succeed in calculus courses. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)
Mathematician Roberto Soto is co-leading a CSUF project to help students pursuing STEM degrees succeed in calculus courses. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)

The project, known as “SEMINAL: Student Engagement in Mathematics Through an Institutional Network for Active Learning,” will emphasize helping underrepresented students succeed in introductory math courses that are foundational in science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.

Active learning in mathematics involves student discovery and inquiry, where the majority of class time is spent with students often working in groups, cooperatively engaging in mathematical activities, while the teacher facilitates, Soto explained.

“This effort will lead to more students getting involved in immersive, STEM-related experiences and  increase st

Mathematician Alison Marzocchi is co-leading a CSUF project to help students pursuing STEM degrees succeed in calculus courses. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)
Mathematician Alison Marzocchi is co-leading a CSUF project to help students pursuing STEM degrees succeed in calculus courses. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)

udents’ ability to make progress in their STEM major and toward graduation,” Marzocchi added.

“As a result, students will be able to graduate in a timely manner with the problem-solving skills necessary to contribute to society, thus helping to meet the objectives of the CSU’s Graduation Initiative 2025,” Soto said.

CSUF was selected for the project from a pool of 47 institutions nationwide.

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